Office of Health Disparities Research

Addressing Health Disparities is Our Priority.

Posts (69)

4 hours ago · Cervical Cancer Screening Rates 'Unacceptably Low,' With Racial Disparities in Screening Rates as Well

A Mayo Clinic study examining the percentage of women, living in Olmsted county, screened for cervical cancer, shows that the number is ‘unacceptably low’ compared to the national average. Additionally, African-American women were only half as likely to be up-to-date on their screenings as white women across the board. Asian women were nearly 30 percent less likely to be current in their screenings than white women. The study was led by Mayo Clinic’s Kathy L. MacLaughlin, MD, and co-led by Robert M. Jacobson, MD, from the department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Cervical cancer rates have dropped dramatically in the past five decades, since physicians have had two screening tests available: the Pap test, which involves visually examining cells collected from the cervix for precancerous or cancerous cells, and the HPV test, which involves detecting the presence in the body of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), which is known to cause precancerous changes and cervical cancer. But if women do not take advantage of screening, the benefits of early detection are lost. Dr. Robert Jacobson stated, “Routine screening every three years with a Pap test or every five years with a Pap-HPV co-test ensures precancerous changes are caught early and may be followed more closely or treated.” Dr. Jacobson was named Minnesota’s 2018 HPV is Cancer Prevention Champion. HPV vaccine is known to prevent cervical cancer in women and other cancers in men. The study team also included OHDR Steering Committee member Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, PhD, who has worked on assessing knowledge and perceptions of HPV and the HPV vaccine in underserved communities for several years. The CDC reports that around 13,000 American women are diagnosed with cervical cancer annual, and that about 4,200 women in the U.S. will die from the disease each year. ARTICLE

Dec 4, 2018 · NAIG: Mayo Clinic's Traumatic Brain Injury Regional Advisory Council: 25 years of Partnership and Collaboration

The Office of Health Disparities Research and the Native American Interest Group welcome Dr. Allen Brown’s talk that will be informative for anyone working with or seeking to form a community advisory board. At NARO’s October organizational advisory board meeting attended by tribal health directors and Mayo representative, a recommendation was made that hearing from someone who has successfully conducted a sustained advisory board would be beneficial for getting the Mayo-tribal health director board launched. Dr. Brown graciously offered to share his experience, so we look forward to his talk on “Mayo Clinic’s Traumatic Brain Injury Regional Advisory Council: 25 Years of Partnership and Collaboration.” Please join us on Tuesday, December 11 at noon in Baldwin 01-507. Call-in and Blackboard connections are listed below. As always RSVPs are helpful for establishing the reach of the NAIG and for ordering the appropriate number of lunches for on-campus attendees.

Date: Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Time: 12:00 pm-1:00 pm (CST)
Location: Baldwin 01-507

RSVP To Wes Petersen by
11/7/18 via:
Email: peterw@mayo.edu
Phone: 507-266-2204

**Box lunches will be available for those attending in Rochester.
This Event is Open to the Public

Connection information:

Call-in information: Number: 866-365-4406 Code: 2844575

Blackboard Connection: https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/6A973C690E9BEEF680897DDD7F9ED9C4

**Use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox if possible

Nov 27, 2018 · OHDR Journal Club "A Community-Partnered Approach to Developing Church-Based Interventions to Reduce Health Disparities Among African-Americans and Latinos"

Thursday, November 29, 2018
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm (MN)
(2:00pm-3:00pm FL and 12:00pm-1:00pm AZ)

Rochester BioBusiness Building 5-22 Conference room

“A Community-Partnered Approach to Developing Church-Based Interventions to Reduce Health Disparities Among African-Americans and Latinos” presented by Chandrika Manjunath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participants can attend the meeting remotely by dialing 1-866-365-4406 with access code 2883946# for audio and click here ( https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/526364029 ) for the video.

This article for Journal Club Discussion is presented by Chandrika Manjunath, a research trainee under Dr. LaPrincess Brewer in cardiology at Mayo Clinic. Chandrika is from Vancouver, BC and graduated in 2017 from The University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario with an Honours Bachelor of Science in Medical Science and Political Science. She is a research trainee under Dr. LaPrincess Brewer in cardiology at Mayo Clinic Rochester. Her current project entitled “Body Image Dissatisfaction Influences Cardiovascular Health in Overweight and Obese African American Women” which is part of Dr. Brewer’s larger community-based mobile health intervention FAITH! (Fostering African-American Improvement in Total Health) to promote cardiovascular health in the African American faith community. Chandrika’s project focuses on a cohort from the larger study, of overweight and obese African American women to determine if their level of dissatisfaction with their bodies plays a contributing role in their achievement of ideal cardiovascular health.

Nov 16, 2018 · Mayo Clinic Well Represented at 2018 AACR Science of Health Disparities Conference

The 11th AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved was held November 2nd-5th in New Orleans.  OHDR Pilot Awardee Lewis Roberts, MB, ChB, PhD, chaired an Education Session entitled Progress in Liver Cancer-From From Screening to Survivorship, with Chee-Chee Stucky, MD, serving on that panel presenting Surgical Resection in Liver and Biliary Cancers.   Native American Research Outreach program director Wesley Petersen, PhD, presented his poster, Impact of a Multi-Theory Community-Based Intervention to Increase Mammographic Screening in a Midwest American Indian Tribe.  Finally, OHDR-funded early career investigator Narjust Duma, MD, presented two posters:  the first, Sex Differences In Tolerability and Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients, and the second,  Assessing Vitamin D and Mammographic Breast Density in a Population of Alaskan Native Women, for which Dr. Duma was selected to receive the AACR Scholar-in-Training Award, supported by the NCI-Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

 

Nov 16, 2018 · Sex and Gender in Alzheimer's Disease--Does it Matter?

In a recently published article, Mayo clinician researcher Michelle Mielke, PhD, discusses issues surrounding the benefits and drawbacks of studying sex and gender differences in the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of Alzheimer’s Disease at all levels, including basic science studies, clinical research, and clinical trials.  She and her co-authors take on the long-standing question of whether the modest understandings gained from studying sex differences in the disease, where, in the U.S., the incidence of AD dementia does not significantly differ between men and women, outweigh the research burdens of doubling the participant pool, lengthening the time of studies, and increasing costs.  ARTICLE

 

Nov 9, 2018 · Pediatric Cancer Researcher Awarded $1.1M Quantum Grant

Hyundai Hope on Wheels recently awarded Richard Vile, PhD, a $1.1M Quantum Grant, funds specifically awarded to support research on pediatric cancers with low survival rates.  Dr. Vile and his research team, who develop experimental cancer therapies based on stimulating antitumor immune responses, will use the grant to focus on new treatments for aggressive pediatric brain tumors, particularly tumors of the brainstem, which currently have a dismal prognosis because their anatomical location is an area susceptible to toxicities associated with reactions of tumors to treatment.  MORE INFORMATION

 

Nov 9, 2018 · Mayo Clinic Team Bridging Basic and Clinical Research to Improve Women's Health Awarded $6.1 Million

The Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have awarded Mayo Clinic a $6.2 million grant to fund a Specialized Center of Research Excellence (SCORE) on sex differences. The overarching theme of the project, entitled Sex-Specific Effects of Endocrine Disruption on Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease, will be to investigate how abrupt loss of ovarian hormones, caused by bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) prior to natural menopause, affects overall aging, physical and cognitive function, and risk for AD pathophysiology. Approximately one-in-eight women have their ovaries removed before reaching natural menopause.  Given the large number of aging women with a history of premenopausal BSO, there is an urgent need to understand the long-term physical and cognitive outcomes of the procedure in order to empower women considering prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy in the future to make more informed decisions. Additionally, a more complete understanding of the biological mechanisms that contribute to the harmful outcomes is essential for finding ways to mitigate or prevent them.  The SCORE will be led by PI’s Michelle M. Mielke, PhD, and Virginia M. Miller, PhD.

SCORE grants are designed to promote interdisciplinary approaches to advance translational research on sex differences; to earn these competitive awards, institutions must develop a research agenda bridging basic and clinical research underlying a health issue pertinent to improving the health of women. Centers of Excellence also serve as vital hubs for education and dissemination of innovative sex-based and informed translational research methods and best practices.  They also provide leadership in the development and promotion of standards and policies for the consideration of sex differences in biomedical research.  The Office of Health Disparities Research’s collaboration with the Office of Women’s Health was received positively by the grant reviewers, and assisted in funding of the grant.  The Mayo Clinic SCORE will be comprised of three cores that will support the SCORE research projects and a career development program, and include an Administrative Core (led by Drs. Mielke and Miller), a Career Enhancement Core, (led by Dr. Miller), and a Research Support Core-Clinical Core (led by Ekta Kapoor, MBBS), as well as three research projects:

Project 1:  Effects of Bilateral Oophorectomy on Physical and Cognitive Aging.  This project will assess the effects of premenopausal BSO on accelerated aging, as measured by declines in physical and cognitive function and plasma levels of senescence and other biomarkers of accelerated aging. Leaders: Michelle M. Mielke, PhD and Walter A. Rocca, MD.

Project 2: Bilateral Oophorectomy on Imaging Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s and Cerebrovascular Diseases. This project will assess the effects of premenopausal BSO on neuroimaging measures of Alzheimer’s disease and cerebrovascular pathology, and determine whether APOE ε4 modifies these effects.  Leader: Kejal Kantarci, M.D.

Effects of Ovariectomy on the Biology of Physical and Cognitive Aging in Mice. A mechanistic complement to the human projects, this project will determine the effects of ovariectomy (OVX) in Project 3: mice on cellular senescence and will measure physical and cognitive function. The project will also determine the temporal sequence and tissue-specific effects of estrogen replacement therapy on cellular senescence. Leader: Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D. 

OHDR congratulates Drs. Mielke, Miller, and all the SCORE researchers on this exciting sex differences research opportunity!

Nov 2, 2018 · Beyond Ancestry: The Production and Consumption of Genetic Knowledge

The Office of Health Disparities Research and the Native American Interest Group welcome Dr. Jessica Blanchard, a Research Scientist at the University of Oklahoma’s Center for Applied Social Research and the Center for the Ethics of Indigenous Genomic Research.  Her research focuses broadly on the reduction of health disparities in American Indian/Alaska Native and other underrepresented communities, with particular focus on issues related to cancer, ethical and social implications of genomic research, and building community partnerships and capacity in health research.

Date: Tuesday November 13, 2018
Time: 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Location: Baldwin 01-507

RSVP To Wes Petersen by
11/9/18 via:
Email: peterw@mayo.edu
Phone: 507-266-2204

**Box lunches will be available for those attending in Rochester.
This Event is Open to the Public

 

Connection information:

Call-in information: Number: 866-365-4406 Code: 2844575

Blackboard Connection: https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/6A973C690E9BEEF680897DDD7F9ED9C4

**Use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox if possible

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